Elements of Literature Second Course
LE0 8-8.6
Refugee in America/from I Have a Dream by Langston Hughes/ Martin Luther King, Jr.
           
More About the Writers
Harlem’s Poet
Langston Hughes left college when he found life in Harlem more interesting than his classes. After traveling to Africa and Europe, Hughes returned to New York and made Harlem his home. Learn how the rhythms of Harlem danced through Hughes’s writing, and how he became “Harlem’s Poet.”
The Private Dr. King
United States history books document the public work of a great civil rights leader, but who was Martin Luther King, Jr., as a man? Open The Seattle Timesto hear Dr. King’s close friends describe the private man who enjoyed pillow fights, jokes, and roadside restaurants.
More from the Writers
Verse as Deep as Rivers
Take a seat at The Academy of American Poets, and sample the poetry of Langston Hughes. Brace yourself for his powerful words calling America to once again become the “homeland of the free.” Then, listen as Hughes describes the many rivers that have given depth to his soul.
The Voice That Shook a Nation
Step back in time through video clips of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. At MSNBC’s Time and Again, you can watch his expressions and feel the power of his voice as Dr. King shares his vision of being “free at last.” Then, witness an interview in which he describes how the Vietnam War turned his dream into a nightmare. Why do you think the words of this nonviolent leader shook the nation?
Crossing the Curriculum: Social Studies
Join a Freedom Ride
What was it like to fight in the struggle for African American equality? Catch a bus at the National Civil Rights Museum for an interactive tour of the battle for civil rights in the United States. Meet pioneers like Ida B. Wells and Dred Scott, and brave the race riots of 1919. Be ready for the last stop, though, as your bus rolls past the room where Dr. King spent the final moments of his life.
 
 
  Return to Top | LE0 8-8.6

   Copyright by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use